All posts by Marc d'Entremont

I travel, cook, eat, observe, interact, live and write. As a chef/food, wine and travel writer, I look for connections among people, their activities, the environment and what they eat that can tell the story of a region/culture, whether that be in the remote Andes Mountains or the streets of Philadelphia. Publications include my travel web site on Argentina (www.travel-with-pen-and-palate-argentina.com) and articles covering a diverse range of countries and cultures at www.travelpenandpalate.com, Hellenic News of America, Original World Travel, Examiner.com (International Travel, International Dining Examiner, Culinary Travel, Food & Recipes and Philadelphia Fine Dining) and Suite101. Industry experience includes over 35 years as a chef, chef educator, hotel and restaurant manager, catering and teaching: history, writing, theater, culinary arts and business. I lived for many years in Puerto Rico and Canada (Nova Scotia). I travel extensively in southern South & Central America, Southeast Asia, Europe, North America and southern Africa. Member: International Food, Wine & Travel Writers Association (IFWTWA) – Board of Directors & Chair Membership Committee Member: American Culinary Federation (ACF)

American genius…young forever

OK…this is an odd posting.

I travel for a living and am often  in and out of hotels.  USA hotels in particular offer…let’s be kind…sub par free “continental breakfasts.” Often I’ll grab a yogurt, hard boiled egg & fruit.

Yesterday, looking in a storage container where I keep paper plates/plastic cups etc for picnics, I came across a tightly sealed bag.  At some point in the past several years I obviously grabbed a muffin, toast, jam & a pastry “on the go” and totally forgot… and I mean several years ago because I had not opened this bin for that long.

"Petrafied" American hotel breakfast food. (2 - 3 years old - no blemish.)
“Petrified” American hotel breakfast food. (2 – 3 years old – blemish free..click pic to expand.)

Lo and behold…on a black plastic plate were perfect stone hard “petrified” American hotel fast food with not a blemish upon them. It’s American genius…and the preservatives will keep me young forever…

 

 

 

You can read all my articles and subscribe to my Examiner columns at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

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Suite 101

Cajun Maque Choux with Pork Chops

Cajun Maque Choux with Pork Chops
Cajun Maque Choux with Pork Chops

IMG_3261Cajun dishes rank among the most misunderstood regional cuisines in the United States. That’s not surprising since it is part of the melange of cultural influences that make up southern Louisiana – French, Spanish, Native American, African, Caribbean and Central America. Often confused with its spicier neighbor, Creole, true Cajun dishes share similarities but are less complex. IMG_3264Today’s Louisiana Cajuns are descendants of the survivors of the Grand Derangement – the British ethnic cleansing of Acadia, French Canada’s Maritime provinces, in the 1760s which resulted in the death of half the Acadian population. Given refuge by Spanish controlled Louisiana, they settled in undesirable disease ridden bayous and marshes. Liz Williams, Director of the New Orleans Southern Food and Beverage Museum stated, “It is very peasant food; a one pot food…it’s more the practices, the mindset rather than the ingredients” that determined Cajun recipes.

1/2" thick boneless pork chops
1/2″ thick boneless pork chops

Acclaimed New Orleans Chef Frank Brightsen commented, “The roots of Acadian culture are living off the land and that means hunting. The heart of Cajun culture around Lafayette is not coastal. Even in grocery stores you’ll find butchers. The pig is central to Cajun culture…”

pork chops with Cajun seasoning
pork chops with Cajun seasoning
diced salt pork
diced salt pork

Simple Acadian dishes such as salt cod cakes became impossible in the absence of potatoes and salt preserved fish. Rice became the starch and the abundance of fresh fish, game, alligator and seafood the additions. Rice, shrimp, and peppers replaced potatoes, cod and cabbage, but a basic Cajun meal is still one dish or simply prepared.

minced parsley
minced parsley

What else constitutes Cajun cuisine – and traditional Acadian fare? Anything deep fat fried – alligator and crawfish (not in Acadia) fish fillets, potatoes, corn-on-the-cob, pork chops, rabbit, game, chicken, and shrimp. Crabs, shrimp and crawfish come steamed as well. Lots of carbohydrates accompany a Cajun meal – and an Acadian meal – with rice, potatoes and corn not uncommon on the same plate along with okra and beans.

blanch a tomato in boiling water
blanch a tomato in boiling water

The greatest difference separating Cajun and Acadian cooking is spices. Acadian rarely goes beyond salt and pepper although they do use pickled combinations such as chow chow to enliven a meal. Cajun uses spices borrowed from Creole cuisine – a different fusion altogether. Of course world famous Tabasco sauce made for the past century and a half on Avery Island has become a Cajun standard even though its origin is clearly West Indian.

skin easily peels away from blanched tomato
skin easily peels away from blanched tomato

Maque Choux is a classic Cajun side-dish that has elements of both Acadian and Cajun dishes. Most of the ingredients are Native North American – corn and peppers – with pork introduced by European colonists. If you visit Louisiana’s Cajun country you will experience variations including some that add sugar – a later 19th century addition.

diced peeled tomato
diced peeled tomato
Cajun seasoning mix
Cajun seasoning mix

There are many variations on “Cajun seasoning.” It’s basically a mixture of salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper, paprika, garlic, onion and assorted spices. The “assorted spices” are best determined by an internet search. Especially important if you have a salt preference, packaged mixes have varying degrees of salt – both Cajun and Creole cooking love salt – but I prefer less  (more for taste and thirst than health reasons).

Maque Choux
Maque Choux

Cajun Maque Choux with Pork Chops Ingredients – 2 servings (simply multiply all ingredients for more servings)

for the pork:

  • 4 – 1/2 inch boneless pork chops
  • low-salt Cajun seasoning

for the Maque Choux

  • 1/4 cup small dice salt pork
  • 1-1/2 cup diced sweet onion
  • 1 cup diced celery
  • 1/3 cup diced bell pepper – green, yellow or red
  • 1 cup diced, peeled fresh tomato
  • 1/8 cup minced fresh parsley
  • 2 cups corn kernels – cut from the cob or frozen
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons low-salt Cajun seasoning
  • hot sauce to taste (optional)

Preparation:

  1. Rub the pork chops with a thin layer of cajun seasoning and refrigerate while preparing the Maque Choux.
  2. To prepare the peeled tomato: bring a saucepan of water to a boil. Drop a large tomato into the boiling water for 30 seconds (small tomato) to 60 seconds (large tomato as pictured.) Remove the tomato to a cutting board. With a sharp knife make a thin cut around the tomato. The skin will easily slip off with your fingers or the blunt side of a dinner knife.
  3. In a heavy frying pan – preferably cast iron – sauté the salt pork until crispy and all the fat has been rendered. Remove the salt pork with a slotted spoon and discard.
  4. Add the onion and sauté for 2 minutes.
  5. Add the celery and sauté for an additional 2 minutes
  6. Add the peppers, tomato, parsley, corn and Cajun seasoning. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
  7. Preheat oven to 250 degrees Fahrenheit.
  8. In an oven proof baking dish spoon some of the Maque Choux to make a bed the size of a pork chop and place the chop to cover half. Overlap the corn and pork for the remaining chops.
  9. Cover with foil and bake for 90 minutes. Remove the foil and bake for an additional 30 minutes.

Serve with rice, a green salad, cold beer or a nice red wine.

salt pork in cast iron pan
salt pork in cast iron pan
saute salt pork
saute salt pork
rendered fat (right) with crisp salt pork (left – discard)
rendered fat (right) with crisp salt pork (left – discard)
saute onions & celery
saute onions & celery
add peppers, tomatoes, parsley
add peppers, tomatoes, parsley, corn & seasoning
arrange in baking dish overlapping pork and Maque Choux, cover with foil and bake according to directions
arrange in baking dish overlapping pork and Maque Choux, cover with foil and bake according to directions

You can read all my articles and subscribe to my Examiner columns at:

Hellenic News of America

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Culinary Travel Examiner

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International Travel Examiner

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Suite 101

Endymion: a New Orleans Mardi Gras Super Krewe

Endymion float Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans
Endymion float Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans

The “super” Krewe of Endymion lived up to its hype. As one of New Orleans largest krewes, founded in 1967, Endymion created new traditions with mega floats using the latest technology of the day and featuring national celebrities from stage, screen and recording studio.

 

 

 

 

Endymion float Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans
Endymion float Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans
Endymion float Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans
Endymion krewe member,  Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans

The 30 plus mega float parade, interspersed with as many marching bands and other groups, is one of the season’s most anticipated. Making its way from City Park in Mid-City down Canal Street and through Uptown to the Mercedes Super Dome for Endymion’s Extravaganza, the estimated crowd was put at 35,000+ watching and participating in the three hour parade.

 

 

Endymion float Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans
Endymion float Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans
A house on Orleans Ave. getting ready for the Endymion parade Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans
A house on Orleans Ave. getting ready for the Endymion parade Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans

The Krewe of Endymion marches on Samedi Gras (Fat Saturday) second only in importance to the season’s ultimate Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday). But parades are only part of the spectacle that make the season (January 6 through Fat Tuesday – in 2015 February 17) New Orleans largest block party.

 

 

Campers and setting up for the Endymion parade Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans on the neutral ground of Orleans Ave.
Campers and reviliers setting up for the Endymion parade Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans on the neutral ground of Orleans Ave.
A U-Haul truck becomes a movable feast for an Endymion parade party, Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans
A U-Haul truck becomes a movable feast for an Endymion parade party, Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans

A full two days ahead intrepid groups of revelers staked out their territory on the wide neutral ground of Orleans Avenue in Mid-City near iconic City Park.  One of the city’s wide boulevards, the grass and often tree shaded middle-of-the-road “neutral ground”  becomes a focal point for a round-the-clock block party. Camping out and cooking  is allowed, porta potties are provided and as Saturday morning arrives every square inch of the long avenue’s neutral ground is a festival in itself. Children toss footballs, parents throw frisbees, barbecues send up aromatic aromas and long tables groan under the weight of such traditional fare as Louisiana crawfish boil and copious amounts of beer. The street and house parties spread throughout the neighborhoods that Endymion snakes through and continue for hours after it passes.

Louisiana crawfish boil
Louisiana crawfish boil

But once the parade rolls the thousands that line the long route have eyes only on the floats and catching the many “throws” from iconic strings of beads to frisbees and creations with flashing lights.

Krewe of Endymion float, Mardi Gras 2015, New Orleans
Krewe of Endymion float, Mardi Gras 2015, New Orleans

See a full list of Mardi Gras 2015 krewe and parade information and  get ready for Fat Tuesday!

 

 

You can read all my articles and subscribe to my Examiner columns at:

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Original World Insights

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International Travel Examiner

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Suite 101

Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans

 

 

Mardi Gras 2015
Mardi Gras 2015

Mardi Gras is not a spectator sport; it’s participatory street theater for all ages. Babies to grandparents don ornamentation from elaborate costumes to strings of battery powered colored lights.

 

Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans
Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans

 

 

 

Krewe of Babylon, Mardi Gras 2015, New Orleans
Krewe of Babylon, Mardi Gras 2015, New Orleans

 

 

 

 

To debunk a myth, Mardi Gras is rarely licentious drunken debauchery.

The evening parades are famous yet  many daytime parades during the season cater to families with huge floats interspersed by impressive student marching bands.

Krewe of Carrollton, Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans
Krewe of Carrollton, Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans

But it’s the evening parades that capture the imagination.

 

Mardi Gras is more than a carnival. It’s the bond among New Orleanians that even nature couldn’t change.

 

Krewe of Muses, Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans
Krewe of Muses, Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans: the only all-womens krewe!!

The flambeaux carrier originally served as a beacon for parade-goers to better enjoy the spectacle of night festivities. They were usually slaves or free men of color.

Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans
Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans flamboux carriers (gas fired torches)

 

Read why Mardi Gras is a man in a pink tutu

and follow links to all the parades of Mardi Gras 2015 in New Orleans

 

Sargon kink of the Krewe of Babylon Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans
Sargon king of the Krewe of Babylon Mardi Gras 2015 New Orleans

 

You can read all my articles and subscribe to my Examiner columns at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

Food & Recipes Examiner

Suite 101

Krewe du Vieux opens New Orleans Mardi Gras

 

DSC07818

The opening parade January 31 for the 2015 New Orleans Mardi Gras season by the Krewe du Vieux maintained the traditional small scale donkey or man-power drawn floats but was LARGER THAN LIFE in political satire mixed with “adult themes.”

New Orleans: Krewe du Vieux, Mardi Gras 2015
New Orleans: Krewe du Vieux, Mardi Gras 2015

The Krewe du Vieux is the ONLY major parade that actually can go through the French Quarter.

traditional Donkey drawn floats, Krewe du Vieux, Mardi Gras 2015
traditional Donkey drawn floats, Krewe du Vieux, Mardi Gras 2015
Krewe du Vieux, Mardi Gras 2015
Krewe du Vieux, Mardi Gras 2015

As you’ll see over the next 2 weeks, the parades are “monumental.” BTW: some of pics in costume are just people viewing the parade, not participants – but in New Orleans, everyone’s a “participants”

 

 

 

 

Krewe du Vieux, Mardi Gras 2015
Krewe du Vieux, Mardi Gras 2015

 

IMG_1951

DSC07783

DSC07780

Click for the complete New Orleans Mardi Gras 2015 schedule.

 

You can read all my articles and subscribe to my Examiner columns at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

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Suite 101

Building New Orleans traditions: Mardi Gras World

Mardi Gras World is a living museum for an international festival as celebrated as it’s misunderstood. Daily public tours showcase a wide range of Mardi Gras themes from the ribald to down home family friendly. And while a guest is snapping photos and listening to the guide, Kern Studio artists are busy in the real work of creating Mardi Gras 2015.

painting a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans
painting a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans

 

Mardi Gras decoration on a French Quarter house mid-January 2015
Mardi Gras decoration on a French Quarter house mid-January 2015

Fat Tuesday falls on February 17th this year (2015)  but in New Orleans, Mardi Gras season  begins on the Twelfth Night of Christmas,  January 6,  which also happens to be the birthday of the city’s patron saint, Joan of Arc. History, legend and real life often create everyday activities in culturally diverse New Orleans. At Mardi Gras World that legacy keeps 50 artists busy year round.

 

a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans
a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans

 

a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans
a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans
a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans
a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans

 

 

 

 

 

a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans
a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans

 

 

 

 

painting a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans
painting a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans

Mardi Gras expresses the uniqueness of a region that’s been home and country to Native Americans, Europeans, Africans, the Americas and displaced populations (Cajuns, slaves). There are Mardi Gras parades from Mobile, Alabama to Galveston, Texas and in every parish in southern Louisiana. But New Orleans is the cultural center of Mardi Gras in North America.

 

a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans
a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans

Mardi Gras is the gumbo of festivals, a melange of cultural and social influences. It has traditions set by krewes – dozens of them – but it’s the individual themes chosen each year by the krewes that make  Mardi Gras parades unpredictable fun. Yet the evolution of Mardi Gras as we know it today is an 1870s invention of New Orleans businessmen to honor the visit of a Russian prince on Fat Tuesday. They created the Krewe of Rex and the good times have been rolling since.

the immense Smokey Mary train float, Mardi Gras World, New Orleans
the immense Smokey Mary train float, Krewe of Orpheus, Mardi Gras World, New Orleans

Mardi Gras World is a family owned juggernaut of monumental float designs. Founded in the 1930s by New Orleans artist Blaine Kern (Kern Studios ) what started as painting random props for parade floats quickly blossomed into contracts with over a dozen of Mardi Gras most influential and historic krewes including Rex. Beyond parades, Kern Studios is the leader in creating “themed environments” for conventions, resorts and the media.

prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans
prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans

The krewes own the massive float infrastructures – the actual moving machines – but the decorations, the props, are usually rented from Kern Studios since themes change annually. Many props today start with a base of styrofoam.

carving the styrofoam base of a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans
carving the styrofoam base of a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans

Often props are repurposed several times and Kern Studio artists make magic with such standard mediums as paper mache to create features.

adding paper mache to a prop before painting at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans
adding paper mache to a prop before painting at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans

The larger than life demensions of most props dictate spray painting as an efficient method, although meticulous brush painting may still be necessary with elaborate detail.

spray painting a prop at Mardi Gras World
spray painting a prop at Mardi Gras World

 

brush painting a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans
brush painting a prop at Mardi Gras World, New Orleans

Appropriate to the city’s nickname, the Big Easy, after the tour guests are free to wander the massive warehouse admiring, photographing and watching the artists at work. One would never guess that the parades begin in a couple short weeks. By the end of January, Mardi Gras season will be in full swing with over two weeks of parades, many showcasing the grandeur and fun of Kern Studio’s Mardi Gras World artistry.

Mardi Gras World, New Orleans
Mardi Gras World, New Orleans

Mardi Gras World, located on the Mississippi River in downtown New Orleans, is open for tours seven days a week. Parking is available but a free shuttle runs from several hotels and tourist locations in the city.

Click  New Orleans Mardi Gras Parade for a complete 2015 schedule.

Watch Smokey Mary in action at the Krewe of Orpheus 2013 parade:

 

You can read all my articles and subscribe to my Examiner columns at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

Food & Recipes Examiner

Suite 101

Battle of New Orleans Bicentennial Concert

 

United States Marine Corps Band New Orleans at St. Louis Cathedral
United States Marine Corps Band New Orleans at St. Louis Cathedral

 

Marine Corps Band New Orleans
Marine Corps Band New Orleans

Both the Cathedral-Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France (c. 1793 & 1850) and the Marines are intimately tied to that seminal day in New Orleans history, January 8, 1815. It was an apt setting 200 years to the day for the United States Marine Corps Band to perform a concert in honor of the bicentennial of the Battle of New Orleans.

Fireworks lit the night sky following the concert, illuminating Jackson Square and trying to shed some light on the the little understood War of 1812.

 

Fireworks at Jackson Square, New Orleans
Fireworks at Jackson Square, New Orleans

Read about this historic concert in…

Marine Corps Band Battle of New Orleans concert

 

Clark Mills equestrian statue (1856) of General Andrew Jackson, Jackson Square, New Orleans
Clark Mills equestrian statue (1856) of General Andrew Jackson, Jackson Square, New Orleans

 

You can read all my articles at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

Food & Recipes Examiner

Twelfth Night in New Orleans

 

Krewe de Jeanne d'Arc's birthday parade
Krewe de Jeanne d’Arc’s birthday parade

Twelfth Night may mark end of Christmas, but January 6 is also the birthday of the Maid of Orleans and in New Orleans that portends the revelries of Mardi Gras in just a few short weeks.

Joan of Arc's birthday King Cake
Joan of Arc’s birthday King Cake
Krewe de Jeanne d'Arc's birthday parade
Krewe de Jeanne d’Arc’s birthday parade

Part medieval morality play, part New Orleans street festival, the Krewe de Jeanne d’Arc’s birthday parade has grown in popular favor since its inception in 2008.  The populace are encouraged to join in the pageantry.

 

Krewe de Jeanne d'Arc's birthday parade
Krewe de Jeanne d’Arc’s birthday parade

Read more in…

New Orleans throws Joan of Arc a birthday bash

 

Staff member of Morning Call Coffee Stand playing the flute during break, City Park, New Orleans
Staff member of Morning Call Coffee Stand playing the flute during break, City Park, New Orleans
City Park, New Orleans
City Park, New Orleans

At over 150 years-old the venerable 1,300 acre City Park could not look better 75% through its nearly 20 year rejuvenation master plan.

 

City Park, New Orleans
City Park, New Orleans

 

You can read all my articles at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

Food & Recipes Examiner

Twas nights before a southern Christmas

 

In Marion Square, Charleston, SC
In Marion Square, Charleston, SC

DSC06665Walk down any Charleston street and you’ll be acknowledged. Stop and ask a question and be prepared for a lengthy and enthusiastic conversation. As one gentleman said, “Charleston’s always been unique.”

DSC06618

 

Did Charleston invent the spirit of Christmas?

 

Jefferson Hotel, Richmond, VA
Jefferson Hotel, Richmond, VA
Santa's Workshop in gingerbread
Santa’s Workshop in gingerbread

Richmond’s elegant Jefferson Hotel used to stock live alligators in the fountain of the Palm Court lobby. How does Christmas top that? Old Pompey, immortalized by a taxidermist, was the last and after his passing in 1948 the fountain was removed.

 

Jefferson Hotel, Richmond, VA
Jefferson Hotel, Richmond, VA

Richmond residents as well as visitors are drawn to both the lobby and hotel restaurants akin to New York’s Time Square – it’s the city’s Christmas focal point. Read why at…

Christmas alligators at the Jefferson Hotel, Richmond, VA

 

Polar Express Christmas trolly tour stop, Historic Pensecola, FL
Polar Express Christmas trolly tour stop, Historic Pensecola, FL
The Happy Pig Cafe, Historic Pensecola
The Happy Pig Cafe, Historic Pensacola

Seville Square and Pensacola’s National Historic District remain one of America’s most enduring Florida gulf shore neighborhoods and a focal point for Christmas festivities.

 

 

 

 

Pensacola National Historic District, FL
Pensacola National Historic District, FL

Read why Historic Pensacola has the ambiance of a village within the 21st century city and Christmas reflects its southern charm.

Historic Florida Christmas in Pensacola Village

 

Glass dome of the Palm Court Lobby, Jefferson Hotel, Richmond, VA
Glass dome of the Palm Court Lobby, Jefferson Hotel, Richmond, VA

You can read all my articles at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

Food & Recipes Examiner

Hersheypark might have been built in New Orleans

Hersheypark, PA, roller coasters
Hersheypark, PA, roller coasters
The Hershey Story: Museum on Chocolate Ave., Hershey, PA
The Hershey Story: Museum on Chocolate Ave., Hershey, PA

But in 1883  Milton Hershey gave up on a southern location and moved back to his home state of Pennsylvania launching a career that would make him a legend. The exhibits in the Hershey Story are laid out within a modern spacious interior in chronological order covering cacao and chocolate processing, the long life and career of Milton Hershey, the company, the town and his legacy.

 

Hershey Hotel from Hershey Gardens, Hershey, PA
Hershey Hotel from Hershey Gardens, Hershey, PA

“ . . .there is no provision for a police department, nor for a jail. Here there will be no unhappiness, then why any crime.” Milton Hershey, 1903, on planning Hershey, PA.

Read about Milton Hershey’s chocolate utopia at…

The Hershey Story is sweet legacy

 

 

sampling the world's chocolate in the Chocolate Lab
sampling the world’s chocolate in the Chocolate Lab

 

You can read all my articles at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

Food & Recipes Examiner