Tag Archives: recipes

Summer Recipes: of figs and chutney

Summer:  a time for fresh fruit, vegetables and taking time off from the daily grind. Do something different. Revert to the past when we all made our own and didn’t just buy it ready to eat. Enjoy!

Mango chutney
Mango chutney

The interplay of sweet fruit, astringent vinegar, fresh ginger, savory onions, spices, a bit of hot pepper and rich brown sugar is not only appealing but a great way to use fresh produce as it comes into season.

Read my recipe with additional photos:

Don’t buy chutney, make it yourself

 

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 I like figs and chevre and caramelized onions. Of course who doesn’t like pizza? And summer time is California fig season in the USA. They’re low in calories, high in potassium, not too sweet and hold up nicely when gently cooked.

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By the early 20th century California fig production was second only to Turkey, Greece, Portugal and Spain.

Read my recipe with additional photos:

         Try a fig and chevre pizza this summer

 

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You can read all my articles at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Travel

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

Food & Recipes Examiner

Luxe Beat Magazine

Suite101

In the Age of Puddings: Historic English and America Cookery

In the Tudor kitchen at Hampton Court Palace, London, UK
In the Tudor kitchen at Hampton Court Palace, London, UK

Robert Fitch answered my question, “porridge was the staff of life” for the common person until the 18th century. No wonder working the palace was a coveted job – even for a spit turner.

The Hampton Court Palace kitchen cooked two meals for approximately 600 people daily consuming in one 16th century year 1,240 oxen, 8,200 sheep, 2,330 deer, 760 calves, 1,870 pigs and 53 wild boar.

When porridge was the staff of life: cookery at Hampton Court Palace

A pudding steaming in the hearth at the Thomas Massey House (c.1696) Broomall, PA
A pudding steaming in the hearth at the Thomas Massey House (c.1696) Broomall, PA

Puddings were a major component of the English and American table during these centuries and often served as the foundation of a one dish meal in this age of cooking on an open wood fired hearth.

Clarissa Dillon on the great age of English puddings

Clarissa Dillon, one of the foremost authorities on 16th-18th century English and colonial American cooking, tackles the often confusing interpretations of our shared culinary past.

Dr. Clarissa Dillon
Dr. Clarissa Dillon

I believe both Fergus and Clarissa would agree that a 17th/18th century middle class diet was healthy only if the diner was physically very active, but it’s tasty. London’s Chef Fergus Henderson and Philadelphia’s Dr. Clarissa Dillon have never met yet share a no-nonsense and unsentimental approach towards the diet of their 17th and 18th century Anglo ancestors.

Eighteenth century appetizers from two culinary historians

Marrow bones at St. John Bar & Restaurant, London, UK
Marrow bones at St. John Bar & Restaurant, London, UK

When St. John Bar & Restaurant at 26 St. John Street, London, was a smokehouse in the 18th century, located a couple blocks from the centuries old Smithfield Market, Hampton Court Palace had a chocolate kitchen catering exclusively to the large royal household.

Chocolate was a London fad when oysters were fast food

King's dining room, 18th century, Hampton Court Palace, London, UK
King’s dining room, 18th century, Hampton Court Palace, London, UK

 

You can read all my articles at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Travel

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

Food & Recipes Examiner

Suite101

 

St. John Bar & Restaurant, London, UK
St. John Bar & Restaurant, London, UK

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Crabs and pineapple – which one is Hawaiian?

Although crab, mushrooms, mango and pineapple all have tropical associations….

the abundance of Hawaii, at Sam Choy Kai Lanai, Kona, Hi
the abundance of Hawaii, at Sam Choy Kai Lanai, Kona, Hi

only crabs and mushrooms are native to Hawaii.

Hamakua Mushrooms, Laupahoehoe, Hi
Hamakua Mushrooms, Laupahoehoe, Hi

Pineapple and mangoes, ubiquitous symbols of tropical islands, are 19th century immigrants to Hawaii.

mangos
mangoes

During the past 200 years Hawaii has become an archipelago of diverse cultural influences. All transitions create controversy, but, fortunately, they rarely involve food.

In my recipe, classic crab cakes, made with wild caught Maryland blue crab, are grilled over hardwood charcoal for an island flavor.

Hawaii as a grilled crab cake with oyster mushrooms and mango pineapple salsa

grilled crab cake with oyster mushrooms and mango pineapple salsa
grilled crab cake with oyster mushrooms and mango pineapple salsa

 

You can read all my articles on Examiner.com at:

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

and

 Food & Recipes Examiner

 

 

Coffee and chocolate and Hawaii and a recipe

Kona coffee crème with salted chocolate caramel macadamia nut sauce
Kona coffee crème with salted chocolate caramel macadamia nut sauce

A recent press trip to the big island of Hawaii inspired me to devise a recipe for

Kona coffee crème with salted chocolate caramel macadamia nut sauce.

With the active encouragement of the Hawaii Regional Cuisine movement and the considerable resources of the Kamehameha School agricultural land use initiative, the future for serious small farmers has rarely been brighter in the islands. With over 300 independent farms growing Kona Coffee and several dozen growing cocoa beans, the future for these Hawaii agricultural products is robust.

cocoa pods at Original Hawaiian Chocolate, Kona, Hi
cocoa pods at Original Hawaiian Chocolate, Kona, Hi

The Kona Coffee Belt, panoramic Hawaii Route 180, hugs the Kona coast. Several dozen farms, including UCC-Hawaii Kona Coffee Estate and Original Hawaiian Chocolate offer tours and tastings. It’s no surprise that coffee and chocolate pair well together, but their Hawaiian story is just as interesting.

Immigrant fruits, a tale of Hawaii grown coffee and chocolate

the Kona coast from UCC-Hawaii Kona Coffee Estate, Kona, Hi
the Kona coast from UCC-Hawaii Kona Coffee Estate, Kona, Hi

 

You can read all my articles on Examiner.com at:

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

and

 Food & Recipes Examiner

 

The Best Shrimp and Grits Ever!

Wild Georgia White Shrimp

King and Prince Shrimp and Grits in a Tasso Cream Sauce

The King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort on St. Simons Island, Georgia, finesses a classic dish served in every southern dinner elevating Shrimp and Grits to a fine dining star.
It was the end of a pleasant sunny early November day in the now quiet off-season of St. Simons Island, one of Georgia’s premiere barrier island destinations. The elegant 1935 King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort, listed on the National Historic Register and Historic Hotels of America, set a table befitting its Old World heritage. The formal place settings with an array of flatware and crystal stemware lay on starched white linen lit by softly glowing candles. The guests are not what the media would identify as royalty or even VIPs. We’re nearly two dozen jaded, or nearly jaded, travel and food journalists – critics to the core.

Southern Culinary Traditions

We were the guests of The King and Prince. Our four day tour to explore the culinary traditions of southeastern Georgia was organized by Leigh Cort Publicity. Such media trips involve a considerable amount of activity, not the least of which is eating and drinking. To make an impression worthy of an article the fare has to be more than just free.

Tradition versus an Old Standby

Personally my foodie radar was picking up more an old diner standby rather than a fine tradition when the itinerary indicated that dinner would include a Shrimp and Grits cooking demonstration. Google any of a dozen recipes and discover everything from bullion cubes to extra sharp cheddar used to mask tasteless farm raised frozen shrimp mounded on top of instant grits. Believe me I’ve had my full of disappointing versions.

Chef Dwayne Austell and Vinny D’Agostino

It took only a moment after entering the dining room for my nose to detect a subtle aroma of warm smoked meat. It was emanating from the chafing dish that was keeping the sauce at serving temperature. I should have guessed that a Johnson & Wales University graduate Food and Beverage Director, Vinny D’Agostino, and Georgia low country native Sous Chef Dwayne Austell would rise above the ordinary.

Wild Shrimp and Tasso Ham

Quality ingredients are essential for a great dish and there is no comparison between farm raised and wild shrimp. Fortunately, much of America’s shrimp is wild and the package will be labeled appropriately. The high tides and lush nutrient rich salt marshes of low country and barrier islands provide an excellent clean environment for Georgia’s abundant shrimp. The Georgia White Shrimp is especially plump, meaty and flavorful. Yet the secret to Chef Austell’s outstanding Shrimp and Grits is the addition of smoky, cured Tasso ham – an essential ingredient in much of southern cajun cuisine. What is actually a pork butt rather than a ham gives the cajun spiced light cream sauce a rich flavor that lingers in the mouth.

The Recipe – for 2 servings

Ingredients:

• 2 cups heavy cream
2/3rd cup diced Tasso ham
1/2 cup fresh or frozen kernel corn
1/2 cup seeded diced tomatoes
4 Tablespoons diced green onions
4 to 6 ounces fresh shelled wild shrimp
2 Tablespoons cajun seasoning mix
1/2 cup grated asiago cheese
salt and pepper to taste
olive oil
cooked grits

Preparation:

First prepare grits using the best recipe I know for Creamy Stone Ground Grits
Add just enough olive oil to lightly cover the bottom of two saute pans and heat over medium setting.
In one pan add the shrimp and cajun seasoning. Saute no more than 5 minutes. Overcooking results in tough shrimp.
In the second pan add the ham and corn and saute for a couple minutes. Add the tomatoes and green onions, combine and saute a few minutes more. Add the heavy cream and asiago cheese. Bring to a simmer and cook for two minutes.
Combine the shrimp and all the pan juices into the sauce.
Serve over the prepared grits.

Wine Pairing

Vinny D’Agostino, a sommelier as well, paired the entree with a nice Georgia Chardonnay from Frogtown Cellars. The minimal acidity of a Chardonnay, preferably unoaked, works well with the creamy sauce. A California or Washington State Chardonnay would be a fine substitute since Georgia wines are not widely distributed.

Even if you’re not dining a few hundred feet from the ocean, this fine recipe from the King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort can conjure memories of warm lazy days under Spanish Moss dripping oak trees and sea gulls laughing overhead.

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