Tag Archives: wildlife

Animals find refuge at Florida’s Homosassa Springs

Bald Eagle, Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, Florida
Bald Eagle, Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, Florida

There are many parks in the United States but Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park is an animal refuge. It’s also enjoyable to visit.

Great Horned Owl, Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
Great Horned Owl, Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park

From the Florida brown bear to iconic bald eagles, these animals were rescued after injury. What may at first seem like a zoo is a haven for these beautiful creatures.

Lucifer, an African hippopotamus at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
Lucifer, an African hippopotamus at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
floating on the Homosassa River at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
floating on the Homosassa River at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park

What was once a zoo-like Florida attraction starting in the 1940s became the Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park in the ‘80s. The goal was to give refuge to animals indigenous to the tropics of the western hemisphere with one exception. Lucifer, the locally popular African hippopotamus, first purchased by the original developers, was designated a Florida citizen by the state legislature. The 50+ year old hippo enjoys a charmed life at the park.

Abundant varieties of fish at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
Abundant varieties of fish at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
some of Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park's animals, such as this squirrel, simply enjoy living at the park
some of Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park’s animals, such as this squirrel, simply enjoy living at the park

The Homosassa springs bubble up from the depths of the Earth at a constant 72° F. This warm water attracts an abundant variety of fish and aquatic animals. The Fish Bowl underwater observatory provides a unique experience to view life under sea level.

In some cases the animals heal enough to be released back into the wild. A park ranger told a story of one owl they thought would not be able to fly after its injury. To their surprise, it was gone one day. Yet the owl seems to miss this refuge. She returns frequently and sometimes stays the night.

A manatee through the underwater observatory at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
A manatee through the underwater observatory at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park

Of great importance is Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park’s manatee program. The endangered manatee, the object of many fatal encounters with Florida pleasure boats, receive expert health care in a state of the art facility. The park is one of the finest locations to view this massive gentle mammal.

Your visit to Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park starts with a slow and picturesque barge trip from the visitor’s center on the Homosassa River. Thickly lined with vegetation the fifteen minute trip is visually beautiful with sunlight creating mirror reflections in the slow moving water. The barge docks at the entrance to the mile-long path that meanders through the various wildlife habitats.

Barge from visitor's center to animal park at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
Barge from visitor’s center to animal park at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
Homosassa River at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
Homosassa River at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park

The park is well designed for disabled visitors, and given the reality that Florida summers are hot and humid, there are sitting areas and concessions selling items from bottled water to ice cream. The air conditioned reptile house is a quiet place to cool down. Knowledgeable rangers are eager to share their stories.

A day at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park is an enjoyable education of what our Earth can be like when humans live in harmony with nature.

flamingos at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
flamingos at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park

When you go:

Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park is located 85 miles north of the Tampa Bay area  or 100 miles west of Orlando – both easy 90 min to 2 hour drives.

There are admission fees and the park is well equipped and accessible to accommodate visitors with a wide range of disabilities.

You can read more articles by Marc d’Entremont at:

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