Tag Archives: Farmers Markets

Ermionida and pomegranates intertwined

Pomegranate Festival

It’s appropriate that an ancient fruit should have a close relationship with an ancient town. Both the pomegranate and Ermioni have been part of recorded history for millennium. Situated in the southeast Peloponnese, the Kranidi region of the Peloponnese is an agriculture powerhouse for Greece especially olives & pomegranate.

The annual Pomegranate Festival in Ermioni held the end of October featured delicious juices, liquors, the seeds, pomegranate inspired art and of course the fruit itself. But the whole town was involved especially the restaurants featuring pomegranate inspired dishes. In Greek mythology the pomegranate was known as the “fruit of the dead,” but it seemed very much alive in Ermioni.

Pomegranate products & crafts

Maria’s on the waterfront this weekend offered a tasty bowl of Greek yogurt topped with apples, thyme honey and pomegranate seeds for breakfast.

One of the more fascinating parts of the Festival were the cooking demonstrations by chef’s from the local area. One dish in particular caught everyone’s attention, and was his original. I would call it a “buckwheat risotto.”

Buckwheat Risotto – approximately 4 servings

  • 1 & 1/2 cups buckwheat
  • 2 & ¼ cups water

(Note: that’s the end of measurements for this dish. Simply increase buckwheat and water if you want more than four servings and play with ratios of honey and pomegranate.)

  1. Cook the buckwheat: Add water to the buckwheat, bring to a boil, then simmer for 20 minutes; Amount after cooking: 4 cups.
Buckwheat Risotto

Combine:

  • thyme honey (at least ¼ a cup)
  • generous handful of washed, dried and chopped cilantro
  • juice of one lime
  • olive oil (at least ½ cup)
  • salt and pepper to taste

Marinate

  1. 1 pound slivered pork loin in the honey mixture until buckwheat is cooked.

Prepare:

  • 1 pound of sweet onions sliced
Buckwheat Risotto

Heat a large skillet

  • Thinly coat with olive oil and then add the onions and caramelize for 10 minutes.
  • Then add the pork and marinade.
  • Stir-fry for a couple minutes and then add at least one cup of white wine
  • Allow the liquid to reduce by 1/3rd then add one Tablespoons dijon mustard.
  • And add 1/3rd cup pomegranate liqueur
  • Then add ½ to 1/3rd cup cream.
  • Stir for a few minutes more add salt and pepper to taste as well as additional pomegranate juice or liqueur until sauce is creamy to taste.

Serve over buckwheat garnished with a good handful of fresh pomegranate seeds and, if desired a sprinkle of feta can be added.

Buckwheat Risotto

The 2017 Pomegranate Festival coincided with the Greek national patriotic commemoration of Ohi Day celebrated throughout Greece, and the Greek diaspora on 28 October each year. Ohi Day commemorates the rejection by Greek Prime Minister Ioannis Metaxas of the ultimatum for surrender made by Italian dictator Benito Mussolini on 28 October 1940.

Ohi Day is celebrated by honoring the youth of Greece, both in the thousands of young lives sacrificed during the bloody 20th century, but in the respect shown by the generations for each other. School after school band march in precision watched by all while towns honor with certificates those high school graduates granted admission in this ancient nation’s universities. The pomegranate may have been the “fruit of the dead,” but it nourished many. Greece understands that youth is not the future; it’s the present.

young Greek traditional dancers

When you go: Ermionia is easily reached by high speed ferry from Piraeus. Or it’s approximately a 2 hour drive from Athens on excellent roads with some stunning views.

Disclaimer: the author was the guest of the Municipality of Ermonia, special Thanks to Mr. A. Laddas. Advance Rent a Car provided transportation to explore the Peloponnese.  Accommodations by Fun In the Sun Travel and Tourism. Press arrangements were made through the MTCgroup

You can read more articles by Marc d’Entremont at:

Hellenic News of America

Travel Pen and Palate Argentina

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Eating Andros

Batsi, Andros Island, Greece

On Andros Island in the Cyclades Islands, it’s easy to be distracted by vistas at every turn. With my first glimpse of the glittering harbor of Batsi it was obvious I’d enjoy four days exploring the island’s coastline and dramatic interior.

I can’t think of a better way to spend a beautiful afternoon than lunch at Taverna Lagoudera on Batsi harbor. When you can still taste the natural saltiness of the Aegean Sea on the sea bream you know you’re in heaven (aka Greece).

Andros and its sister island Tinos (the subject of my March Hellenic News article) are affluent escapes with more villas than hotel rooms. Within easy access of Athens through the port of Rafina, the comfortable car-ferries of the Fast Ferry group run year round. Restaurants, cafes and coffee shops thrive on this island

…..read more about them at:

The shifting beauty of autumn on Andros Island

 

 

Grilled Vegetable Stack

 

Please read more articles by Marc d’Entremont at:

Hellenic News of America

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A farmers market in Manhattan

The culinary arts intersect with the performing arts in New York City.

Tucker Square Greenmarket
Tucker Square Greenmarket
 Who would except to find farmers markets in Manhattan? Yet they are becoming increasingly popular.  The Tucker Square Thursday Greenmarket offers locally grown produce directly across for the iconic Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.
at the Tucker Square Greenmarket
at the Tucker Square Greenmarket
at the Tucker Square Greenmarket
at the Tucker Square Greenmarket
at the Tucker Square Greenmarket
at the Tucker Square Greenmarket
at the Tucker Square Greenmarket
at the Tucker Square Greenmarket
Lincoln Center
Lincoln Center

Save

Save

Postcards from seven Greek Islands: have fun this summer

Kythnos island
Kythnos island

It is an undeniable cliché that the islands of Greece are firmly part of the great destinations of the world. It’s an extra pleasure to be a guest on one of the lesser known islands, Kythnos.  The island is ideal for tourists who seek tranquility. Five photo perfect villages dot the island and all are easy to reach by car. Their compact size makes them enjoyable to wander on foot. Kythnos being a classic Cyclades mountaintop, driving the roads means going either up or down until on the spine of the island. The panoramic views are spectacular. Read my article in the Hellenic News of America,  Kythnos: small island with a big Greek heart.

 

Ios Island
Ios Island

Homer chose Ios as his final resting ground. His tranquil burial site on the herb blanketed north hills of the island offers a panoramic view of the Aegean. In the 21st century thousands of young tourist in July and August choose the island for its clubs, resorts, secluded beaches and music scene. Yet even at the height of the summer season and certainly the remaining ten months of the year, the tranquility Homer enjoyed for millenniums is the genuine character of Ios.  my article in the Hellenic News of America,  Slow down on the Greek party island of Ios   tells you how to still have fun!

 

Paros Island
Paros Island

Flowering shrubs, trees, herbs and succulents blanket the hillsides while clear Aegean water laps Paros Island’s shore. Classic white villages accented with blue are surrounded by soil envied in the Cyclades. Buildings jumble upon one another like blocks and many pre-industrial stone streets are pedestrian only, too narrow for anything more mechanized than a scooter.  Ancient and protected grape vines thrive along with winter wheat, olives, fruit and produce. Please read about Savor culinary and historic Paros Island in the Hellenic News of America.

 

Milos, Greece
Milos, Greece

From volcanic cooking at Cafe Restaurant Sirocco on the island of Milos to Barriello’s 150-year-old vaulted  basement in ancient Trypiti, the culinary scene in Milos is part of a trend among young Greek chefs to preserve grandmother’s recipes but tweak them for the 21st century. Read about this gastronomic find in the Hellenic News of America in Eating Milos: culinary stars in a Cycladic galaxy

 

Sifnos Island
Sifnos Island

The steep Sifnos Island hillsides that rise from the Aegean Sea are crisscrossed by dozens of centuries old foot and donkey paths. These tended rock walled paths still connect island towns. With the decline in the use of donkeys, Sifnos tourism promotes them as ideal walking trails, although a hiker will have to make way for goats and the occasional working donkey. This acceptance that both ancient and every day reality still coexist is the unique pleasure of Sifnos, and in the Hellenic News of America find out why Tradition crafts 21st century Sifnos.

 

Selene's, Santorini Island
Selene’s, Santorini Island

“Selene is zero distance from farm to table,” Georgia Tsara says with a broad smile obviously as pleased with the restaurant’s location on Santorini as she is with this fabled island’s products. The volcano that blew Santorini into history 3,500 years ago is responsible for sculpting the magnificent and photogenic 800-foot cliffs currently topped by some of the most sought after hotels in all the Greek Islands.It’s responsible as well for some products unique in all of Greece, and my article,  A Santorini lunch with Selene’s Georgia Tsara in the Hellenic News of America will guide you to one of the finest meals you’ll experience in your travels.

 

Alonissos Island
Alonissos Island

Not all Greek islands are similar, just as the mainland is a patchwork of ecosystems. The Cyclades, the tourist mecca of islands in the south Aegean, tend to be dry with low vegetation and whitewashed villages trimmed in blue shuttered windows and doors. Alonissos, located in the central Aegean, is the most northerly of the Sporades islands with towering pine forests tumbling down the rocky cliffs to the sea. They’re more akin to the northern New England coast of the U.S.A. than southern Greece. Discover why Alonissos Island is a floating spoon sweet.

 

Santorini Island
Santorini Island

You can read more articles by Marc d’Entremont at:

Hellenic News of America

Travel Pen and Palate Argentina

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A Florida restaurant bakers dozen

Casa Marina Hotel, Jacksonville Beach, FL
Casa Marina Hotel, Jacksonville Beach, FL

Among Florida’s Roaring Twenties grand hotels it seems Al Capone slept in many, including Casa Marina. The mid-1920s Prohibition era was profitable for Florida including Jacksonville Beach. The beachfront Mediterranean Revival club-like Casa Marina, complete with a sprinkler system, opened in 1925 to a high living bi-coastal clientele.

Casa Marina Hotel Penthouse Lounge, Jacksonville Beach, FL
Casa Marina Hotel Penthouse Lounge, Jacksonville Beach, FL

Ninety years later on the deck of the Penthouse Lounge & Martini Bar overlooking the Atlantic’s pounding surf Casa Marina serves a premium Tequila Margareta – without the slushy ice – that I’m confident infamous Al would approve.

 

 

 

Read what intrigued even the big Al to Jacksonville Beach…

Al Capone slept at Casa Marina on Jacksonville Beach

 

Lobster & Mango Salad, Sea Salt, St. Petersburg
Lobster & Mango Salad, Sea Salt, St. Petersburg

Blessed with Florida’s agricultural and ocean abundance at their doorstep, restaurants in St. Petersburg don’t have to search far for quality ingredients.

Smoked Fish Sandwich, Ted Peters Famous Smoked Fish, St. Petersburg, FL
Smoked Fish Sandwich, Ted Peters Famous Smoked Fish, St. Petersburg, FL

A relaxed Gulf of Mexico life style and plenty of Florida sunshine draw residents and tourists to a plethora of cafes, fine dining, bars and beach side venues serving traditional fried fish platters to truffled wild mushroom risotto. With an emphasis on independent ownership St. Petersburg chefs have the freedom to experiment or just create the best grilled grouper sandwich on the beach. Here’s a dozen to try in the St. Petersburg area…

A dozen good reasons to eat St. Pete

 

Maximo Moorings Seafood Shack, St. Petersburg, FL
Maximo Moorings Seafood Shack, St. Petersburg, FL

 

You can read all my articles and subscribe to my Examiner columns at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

Food & Recipes Examiner

Gold, God…potatoes…in Quito, Ecuador

 

 

Iglesia de San Francisco. Quito, Ecuador
Iglesia de San Francisco. Quito, Ecuador

 

La Iglesia de la Compañía de Jesús, Quito, Ecuador
La Iglesia de la Compañía de Jesús, Quito, Ecuador

Since the start of history gold has been connected to the divine and the boundaries of people, state and heaven have intertwined in myriad and mysterious patterns.  In post conquest 16th century Quito (Ecuador), An A-list of priests, monks and nuns from four of the Church’s most influential religious orders provided the patronage for a celebrated era of artistic expression.

La Iglesia de la Compañía de Jesús, Quito, Ecuador
La Iglesia de la Compañía de Jesús, Quito, Ecuador

Sumptuous interior decorations, intricate carvings and golden altars express prominent Moorish geometrical figures, Italian Renaissance style and European baroque architecture. In the 1970s UNESCO dubbed it “Quito Baroque” in their 1978 designation of Quito as a World Heritage Site.

 

 

 

 

Just click the link to see many more photos and read the article…

To the glory of gold and God in Quito, Ecuador

 

The iconic soup of Ecuador: Locro de Papa
The iconic soup of Ecuador: Locro de Papa
One of 200 varieties potatoes in Ecuador
One of 200 varieties potatoes in Ecuador

At least 4,000 varieties of potatoes grow in the Andean Highlands that encompass territory stretching from northern Argentina through Ecuador. An important food staple for all pre-Columbian Andean cultures, the Incas created chunu – dehydrated potatoes that could be stored for up to a decade.

Read how a vegetable becomes a national icon and follow a simple recipe for an Ecuador national dish:

The iconic soup of Ecuador: Locro de Papa

 

rich soil in the crater of Pululahua Volcano just north of Quito
rich soil in the crater of Pululahua Volcano just north of Quito

 

You can read all my articles and subscribe to my Examiner columns at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

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Suite 101

San Diego and La Jolla: hotbed for slow food

 

Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Jolla, CA
Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Jolla, CA
Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Jolla, CA
Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Jolla, CA

From the rustic refinement of La Jolla’s Torrey Pines Lodge to the local spunk of Rubio’s citywide Fresh Mexican Grill, there’s a locally owned venue in any price bracket for all residents to patronize in this southern California urban county, and they seem to happily do so often.

Ribs at the La Jolla Open Aire Market
Ribs at the La Jolla Open Aire Market
Sunset off Del Mar, San Diego
Sunset off Del Mar, San Diego

Sea, cliffs, beach and mountain vistas abound, the climate begs for outdoor dining and the region’s relative affluence blend to create menus of imagination and freshness – California Modern.

Come read about eleven restaurants and a market that exemplify the best San Diego, La Jolla and Southern California offers…

 

Eat California Modern in San Diego and La Jolla 

 

Hotel Del Coronado, San Diego
Hotel Del Coronado, San Diego

You can read all my articles at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

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Rehoboth Beach and Harrisburg: an art and culinary drive

Harrisburg the capital of Pennsylvania and Rehoboth Beach in far southern Delaware may be 165 miles apart, but they share similar European colonial origins, the Susquehanna/Chesapeake Bay river basin and legendary farmlands.

Wearable art at the Art League of Rehoboth
Wearable art at the Art League of Rehoboth
Larry Ringgold,  driftwood horse sculpture,  Peninsula Gallery
Larry Ringgold, driftwood horse sculpture, Peninsula Gallery

 

From plein air painters feasting on the raw natural beauty of beaches and marshland to cutting edge jewelry design, southern Delaware has nurtured the arts for the past century.  As the motto of the Art League of Rehoboth says, Art Grows Here.™

 

 

Abraxas Hudson, artist , owner Abraxas Studio of Art, Lewes, DE.
Abraxas Hudson, artist , owner Abraxas Studio of Art, Lewes, DE.

 

View eleven of Sussex County’s best galleries at…

 Southern Delaware art galleries break design barriers

 

Cafe Fresco's Dim Sum Donuts
Cafe Fresco’s Dim Sum Donuts

 

a Pennsylvania dairy farm
a Pennsylvania dairy farm

Before there was state government, before there was coal, iron, steel and chocolate, farm and tavern table were always next-door. The ingredients to make a creamy mushroom risotto, charcuterie, or a Polish vegetarian chili are still from the earth surrounding the Harrisburg/Hershey region.

Bar at Devon Seafood Grill
Bar at Devon Seafood Grill

 

A spotlight on eight venues offering  culinary creativity…

Where farm and table are always next door 

 

Scrambled eggs w/truffles, pheasant sausage at Suba
Scrambled eggs w/truffles, pheasant sausage at Suba

 

You can read all my articles at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

Food & Recipes Examiner

New Orleans is SoFAB

 

A Garden District queen
A Garden District queen

DSC00260Legendary New Orleans: hurricanes can’t destroy it; corrupt politics can’t infect it; potholes can’t deter its beauty.

 

 

Sazerac: the "official" drink of New Orleans
Sazerac: the “official” drink of New Orleans
Napoleon House (circa 1791)
Napoleon House (circa 1791)

 

Food and drink sustain it: “We’ll always have hospitality,” says celebrity chef Frank Brigtsen.

 

Chef Frank Brigtsen at the New Orleans Cooking Experience
Chef Frank Brigtsen at the New Orleans Cooking Experience

“I was taught by Paul Prudhomme; it was one the greatest blessings in my life, and I want to give back and foster the next generation of New Orleanians to at least learn and respect the cuisine.”

Gumbo
Gumbo

“As we diversify the types of food being cooked in the city of New Orleans, it’s even more important to me to make gumbo and keep that going.”

 

 

Read my exclusive interview with famed chef Frank Brigtsen.

Chef Frank Brigtsen is a New Orleans Cooking Experience

 

Liz Williams, director of SoFAB
Liz Williams, director of SoFAB
Lobster, crab & avocado cocktail
Lobster, crab & avocado cocktail

“Creole cuisine, the food of New Orleans, it’s a living thing. Nobody’s trying to stop it from changing; nobody said its got to end, so that’s why it’s still alive.”

 

Is there a beverage that defines the South? Creole and Cajun fusion? (or confusion)  In my interview with Liz Williams, director of the Southern Food & Beverage Museum (SoFAB), she answers all and states the mission of this unique institution, “Look at cultural attitudes towards the foods, not just a recipe.”

Liz Williams is SoFAB in New Orleans

 

Cajun Alligator sausage
Cajun Alligator sausage

 

You can read all my articles at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Travel

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

Food & Recipes Examiner

New energy for Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Fireworks over the Susquehanna River from City Island
Fireworks over the Susquehanna River from City Island

A new generation of young professionals have reversed the population decline, want an urban experience and are revitalizing Harrisburg.

Ralph Vartan, Michael Wilson & Danielle Prokopchak
Ralph Vartan, Michael Wilson & Danielle Prokopchak

Read about the movers reshaping a once “rust-belt” city at…

The faces of a new Harrisburg

 

Stained glass dome of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court Chambers, Capitol Building
Stained glass dome of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court Chambers, Capitol Building

Harrisburg is still one of the major railroad transportation hubs of the Northeast connecting to the west and the south. Old steel mill buildings and warehouses have been repurposed for new specialized industries and institutes of higher education.

Lark Quartet, Harrisburg
Lark Quartet, Harrisburg

Read more about Harrisburg’s new mayor – not a cookie cutter politician!

Sense the energy of 21st century Harrisburg

 

roast duck at Carley's glazed with a not overly sweet orange plum sauce and topping wilted spinach and goat cheese infused polenta.
roast duck at Carley’s glazed with a not overly sweet orange plum sauce and topping wilted spinach and goat cheese infused polenta.

Farmers who created Pennsylvania’s moniker the “American breadbasket” in the late 18th century built Harrisburg.

Buddha Buddha's cucumber martini
Buddha Buddha’s cucumber martini

Young professionals flooding center city Harrisburg, PA, have a penchant for gathering with friends – that’s fueling a revitalization of hospitality businesses. Read the rest of the article at…

Revitalizing Harrisburg hospitality along with the city

 

DSC09516

You can read all my articles at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Travel

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

Food & Recipes Examiner