Tag Archives: international food

Postcards from seven Greek Islands: have fun this summer

Kythnos island
Kythnos island

It is an undeniable cliché that the islands of Greece are firmly part of the great destinations of the world. It’s an extra pleasure to be a guest on one of the lesser known islands, Kythnos.  The island is ideal for tourists who seek tranquility. Five photo perfect villages dot the island and all are easy to reach by car. Their compact size makes them enjoyable to wander on foot. Kythnos being a classic Cyclades mountaintop, driving the roads means going either up or down until on the spine of the island. The panoramic views are spectacular. Read my article in the Hellenic News of America,  Kythnos: small island with a big Greek heart.

 

Ios Island
Ios Island

Homer chose Ios as his final resting ground. His tranquil burial site on the herb blanketed north hills of the island offers a panoramic view of the Aegean. In the 21st century thousands of young tourist in July and August choose the island for its clubs, resorts, secluded beaches and music scene. Yet even at the height of the summer season and certainly the remaining ten months of the year, the tranquility Homer enjoyed for millenniums is the genuine character of Ios.  my article in the Hellenic News of America,  Slow down on the Greek party island of Ios   tells you how to still have fun!

 

Paros Island
Paros Island

Flowering shrubs, trees, herbs and succulents blanket the hillsides while clear Aegean water laps Paros Island’s shore. Classic white villages accented with blue are surrounded by soil envied in the Cyclades. Buildings jumble upon one another like blocks and many pre-industrial stone streets are pedestrian only, too narrow for anything more mechanized than a scooter.  Ancient and protected grape vines thrive along with winter wheat, olives, fruit and produce. Please read about Savor culinary and historic Paros Island in the Hellenic News of America.

 

Milos, Greece
Milos, Greece

From volcanic cooking at Cafe Restaurant Sirocco on the island of Milos to Barriello’s 150-year-old vaulted  basement in ancient Trypiti, the culinary scene in Milos is part of a trend among young Greek chefs to preserve grandmother’s recipes but tweak them for the 21st century. Read about this gastronomic find in the Hellenic News of America in Eating Milos: culinary stars in a Cycladic galaxy

 

Sifnos Island
Sifnos Island

The steep Sifnos Island hillsides that rise from the Aegean Sea are crisscrossed by dozens of centuries old foot and donkey paths. These tended rock walled paths still connect island towns. With the decline in the use of donkeys, Sifnos tourism promotes them as ideal walking trails, although a hiker will have to make way for goats and the occasional working donkey. This acceptance that both ancient and every day reality still coexist is the unique pleasure of Sifnos, and in the Hellenic News of America find out why Tradition crafts 21st century Sifnos.

 

Selene's, Santorini Island
Selene’s, Santorini Island

“Selene is zero distance from farm to table,” Georgia Tsara says with a broad smile obviously as pleased with the restaurant’s location on Santorini as she is with this fabled island’s products. The volcano that blew Santorini into history 3,500 years ago is responsible for sculpting the magnificent and photogenic 800-foot cliffs currently topped by some of the most sought after hotels in all the Greek Islands.It’s responsible as well for some products unique in all of Greece, and my article,  A Santorini lunch with Selene’s Georgia Tsara in the Hellenic News of America will guide you to one of the finest meals you’ll experience in your travels.

 

Alonissos Island
Alonissos Island

Not all Greek islands are similar, just as the mainland is a patchwork of ecosystems. The Cyclades, the tourist mecca of islands in the south Aegean, tend to be dry with low vegetation and whitewashed villages trimmed in blue shuttered windows and doors. Alonissos, located in the central Aegean, is the most northerly of the Sporades islands with towering pine forests tumbling down the rocky cliffs to the sea. They’re more akin to the northern New England coast of the U.S.A. than southern Greece. Discover why Alonissos Island is a floating spoon sweet.

 

Santorini Island
Santorini Island

You can read more articles by Marc d’Entremont at:

Hellenic News of America

Travel Pen and Palate Argentina

Original World Insights

 

5 Vietnam destinations not to be missed

 

Temple of Literature Hanoi
Temple of Literature Hanoi

The Annamite Mountains divide Vietnam’s one thousand mile strip of mountains and beaches along the Pacific Ocean. The south is tropical year round, but northern winters can be cold and damp. Political upheaval in the late 18th century led to the Nguyen Dynasty’s triumphant unification of the northern and southern factions in the early 1800s.

The Imperial City, Hue
The Imperial City, Hue

Yet political upheaval seems to have been the natural order often until 1975. The end of America’s Vietnam War allowed the Vietnamese to concentrate on what they enjoy the most — doing business. Whether it’s a BMW auto dealership in Hanoi or a convenience store in a rowboat on a bay, the Vietnamese are capitalists. It’s part of the throb of real life in Vietnam.

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Part of life is also stunning natural beauty, crazy traffic, the silence of fog on a bay and the iridescence of a fresh pearl just shucked from its shell. One trip is not enough. This exploration highlights five key destinations in the north.

Wedding pictures at Hoan Kiem Lake , Hanoi
Wedding pictures at Hoan Kiem Lake , Hanoi

Please read the rest of…

The throb of life in northern Vietnam

in the Hellenic News of America

Hạ Long Bay
Hạ Long Bay

You can read all my articles and subscribe to my Examiner columns at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

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 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

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Two Irish village gems: Kinsale and Westport

Kinsale, Ireland
Kinsale, Ireland

Kinsale’s history is drama beyond its size.

Kinsale, Ireland
Kinsale, Ireland

Yet tranquility reigned on these soft days of late August showers that alternated with brilliant sunshine. Everyone on the streets – punctuated by bright red, deep blue or even burnt orange painted houses – settled into the rhythms of the photo perfect port town with the distinct sounds of seagulls and a charming child-size waterfront amusement park.

Kinsale, Ireland
Kinsale, Ireland

Kinsale was founded in the early 1300s by the Plantagenet dynasty of England. Based on the success of Celtic Mediterranean sea routes,  for the next 500 years Kinsale would become the wine distribution center for Europe generating vast fortunes….

Charles Fort, Kinsale, Ireland
Charles Fort, Kinsale, Ireland

…and attention as it was fought over for centuries with the very independence of Ireland in balance. Read why

Kinsale is the most beautiful village in Ireland

 

skeet shooting, Westport House, Ireland
skeet shooting, Westport House, Ireland

The legend of Irish ‘pirate queen’ Grace O’Malley – Ó Máille Clan chieftain ­­­– is in the history books, yet as important as that was it would be passing down her entrepreneurial pluck and the aristocratic titles and privileges conferred on succeeding generations that would perpetuate Grace O’Malley’s family into the 21st century.

Croagh Patrick, County Mayo, Ireland
Croagh Patrick, County Mayo, Ireland

Adding to this allure is the photogenic village of Westport and elegant Westport House creations of enlightened 18th century concepts in estate planning.

Carrowbeg River mall, Westport, Ireland
Carrowbeg River mall, Westport, Ireland

So morphing Westport House estate during the 1960s into a family-oriented tourist attraction made perfect entrepreneurial sense.

zorbing, Westport House, Ireland
zorbing, Westport House, Ireland

Find out what’s zorbing at

Irish chieftain Grace O’Malley would approve of Westport

 

swans at Westport House, Ireland
swans at Westport House, Ireland

 

You can read all my articles and subscribe to my Examiner columns at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

Culinary Travel Examiner

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International Travel Examiner

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A Culinary Renaissance in Quebec City

Poutine at Le Chic Shack, Quebec City
Poutine at Le Chic Shack, Quebec City

Perhaps poutine is an apt example of a half-century of culinary evolution in Quebec City. Invented in the 1950s, this fast-food combination of French fries topped with fresh cheese curds and smothered in beef gravy became virtually the Quebec national dish and for years the butt of jokes in other parts of Canada – that is until the 21st century. In recent years poutine has changed under the talented hands of imaginative chefs and has migrated to major North American food centers from Philadelphia to Vancouver. From cafes to fine dining restaurants, additions from smoked bison to wild mushrooms and even foie gras now grace hand cut fries, squeaky organic cheese curds and lighter herb flavored gravies.

Mini lobster salads at Quebec Hilton
Mini lobster salads at Quebec Hilton

That same evolution in cuisine under both the talents of seasoned chefs and a new generation brought up on the media’s internationalization of tastes are transforming Quebec City into a sought after dining destination. Yet traditions remain; they’re simply being tweaked. The same incomparable food products Quebec agriculture has always produced now take center of the plate as the following nine city restaurants so admirably prove.

Read more at Eat Québécois in Quebec City

 

Blue fin tuna at Toast, Quebec City
Blue fin tuna at Toast, Quebec City

 

You can read all my articles and subscribe to my Examiner columns at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

 

Andean Cuisine in Quito, Ecuador

Flaming black clams, Los Milagros Restaurant, Centro Historico Quito
Los Milagros Restaurant, Centro Historico Quito

Only a few restaurants in Quito still serve cuy (roasted guinea pig) anymore, and it has become an exotic food. Although still common in remote village cuisines, even in urban Ecuador the sides would include potatoes, corn and grains in a variety of forms.

Giant shrimp stuffed chicken breast, Opera Restaurant, Hotel Dann Carlton
Giant shrimp stuffed chicken breast, Opera Restaurant, Hotel Dann Carlton

Giant shrimp do not belong in the central Andes of Ecuador, but they do on the long Pacific coast. Modern transportation provides the means today to easily market foods within geographic regions.

pan fried corn nuts & toasted beans are a common garnish/snack
pan fried corn nuts & toasted beans are a common garnish/snack

Quinoa, potatoes and corn are but three of a copious number of food stuffs indigenous to the Central Andes. Spanish conquest in the 16th century spread both these and many other agricultural products worldwide and introduced pigs and beef to South America. Today highways allow Ecuador’s Amazon River and Pacific Ocean fish and seafood to be served fresh in Quito at 9,000 feet elevation.

Los Milagros Restaurant, Centro Historico Quito
Los Milagros Restaurant, Centro Historico Quito

In a recent trip to Quito I explored seven restaurants that firmly base their menus on traditional cuisine yet take a liberal hand their reinterpretation for the 21st century plate.

Read more at:

Evolving Andean cuisine at seven Quito restaurants

 

El Patio Andaluz, Centro Historico Quito
El Patio Andaluz, Centro Historico Quito

 

You can read all my articles and subscribe to my Examiner columns at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

Culinary Travel Examiner

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International Travel Examiner

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Suite 101

Gold, God…potatoes…in Quito, Ecuador

 

 

Iglesia de San Francisco. Quito, Ecuador
Iglesia de San Francisco. Quito, Ecuador

 

La Iglesia de la Compañía de Jesús, Quito, Ecuador
La Iglesia de la Compañía de Jesús, Quito, Ecuador

Since the start of history gold has been connected to the divine and the boundaries of people, state and heaven have intertwined in myriad and mysterious patterns.  In post conquest 16th century Quito (Ecuador), An A-list of priests, monks and nuns from four of the Church’s most influential religious orders provided the patronage for a celebrated era of artistic expression.

La Iglesia de la Compañía de Jesús, Quito, Ecuador
La Iglesia de la Compañía de Jesús, Quito, Ecuador

Sumptuous interior decorations, intricate carvings and golden altars express prominent Moorish geometrical figures, Italian Renaissance style and European baroque architecture. In the 1970s UNESCO dubbed it “Quito Baroque” in their 1978 designation of Quito as a World Heritage Site.

 

 

 

 

Just click the link to see many more photos and read the article…

To the glory of gold and God in Quito, Ecuador

 

The iconic soup of Ecuador: Locro de Papa
The iconic soup of Ecuador: Locro de Papa
One of 200 varieties potatoes in Ecuador
One of 200 varieties potatoes in Ecuador

At least 4,000 varieties of potatoes grow in the Andean Highlands that encompass territory stretching from northern Argentina through Ecuador. An important food staple for all pre-Columbian Andean cultures, the Incas created chunu – dehydrated potatoes that could be stored for up to a decade.

Read how a vegetable becomes a national icon and follow a simple recipe for an Ecuador national dish:

The iconic soup of Ecuador: Locro de Papa

 

rich soil in the crater of Pululahua Volcano just north of Quito
rich soil in the crater of Pululahua Volcano just north of Quito

 

You can read all my articles and subscribe to my Examiner columns at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

Food & Recipes Examiner

Suite 101

Where Asia and Europe flow together: Kavala, Greece

 

Kavala, Greece
Kavala, Greece
the Imaret (early 19th century) now boutique hotel.
the Imaret (early 19th century) now boutique hotel.

The twisting streets of Kavala’s old city reveals its recent past. The architecture is a mosaic of historical patterns befitting a port city serving empires. Known as Neapolis for its first thousand years, Kavala has born witness to dreamers and emperors since the 7th century B.C.  It’s easy to marvel at the 16th century engineering beauty of the Kamares aquaduct from the fortress.

 

The Kamares aquaduct (15th century)
The Kamares aquaduct (15th century)

Adding to the charm of the city are important and entertaining sites in the nearby countryside – the impressive remains of Philippi,  Lydia, the Krinides Therapeutic Clay Baths and vineyards on the mountain where Dionysus resided in the Pangaion Hills.

Ktima Biblia Chora vineyard on the slopes of Mt. Pangaion.
Ktima Biblia Chora vineyard on the slopes of Mt. Pangaion.

 

To get there, stay at, go to and dine please read…

Kavala: still fresh after 2,700 years

 

N 40° 55' dining room at the Lucy Hotel, Kavala
N 40° 55′ dining room at the Lucy Hotel, Kavala

 

You can read all my articles at:

Hellenic News of America

Original World Insights

Culinary Travel Examiner

 International Dining Examiner

International Travel Examiner

Philadelphia Fine Dining Examiner

Food & Recipes Examiner